Dating anything that moves

16 Feb

Turse reported finding bodies in a field and photographed skulls of men suffocated to death in a shipping container.Writing in Proceedings Magazine, the official publication of the U. Naval Institute, Richard Ruth, a professor of SE Asian Studies at the U. Naval Academy wrote: "Turse combines original on-site investigations and fresh archival research with a rich sampling of supporting material from several well-known histories and memoirs.A journalist by training, he interviewed survivors from several massacres as a supplement to the Criminal Investigation Command files he uncovered.And then when [we would] get in the village there would be women and kids crying and sometimes hurt or dead." A later Newsweek investigation concluded that as many as five thousand civilians were killed during Speedy Express. Writing in Proceedings Magazine, the official publication of the U. Naval Institute, Richard Ruth, a professor at the U. Naval Academy wrote: "Turse argues that the enormous toll of civilian victims was neither accidental nor unpredictable.The Pentagon's demand for quantifiable corpses surged down the chain of command, through all branches of the U. military, until many units had become fixated on producing indiscriminate casualties that they could claim as enemy kills. soldiers to rack up thousands of kills over multiple tours.

One article exposed water-boarding and electrical torture carried out by the U. 172nd Military Intelligence unit of the 173rd Airborne Division. Turse stated that official military documents show that on February 25, 1969, Sergeant Roy Bumgarner captured and executed Vietnamese civilians, then planted weapons on their bodies and reported them to his superior officers as enemy Vietnamese soldiers killed during combat.A military court convicted Bumgarner of manslaughter, reduced his rank and cut his pay.