Validating customs power of attorney

04 Feb

Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. (5) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The student is expected to: (A) describe how the characteristics and issues in U. history have been reflected in various genres of art, music, film, and literature; (B) describe both the positive and negative impacts of significant examples of cultural movements in art, music, and literature such as Tin Pan Alley, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Generation, rock and roll, the Chicano Mural Movement, and country and western music on American society; (C) identify the impact of popular American culture on the rest of the world over time; and (D) analyze the global diffusion of American culture through the entertainment industry via various media. The student understands how people from various groups contribute to our national identity. The student understands the impact of science, technology, and the free enterprise system on the economic development of the United States.(3) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as state papers, legal documents, charters, constitutions, biographies, autobiographies, speeches, letters, literature, music, art, and architecture is encouraged.Motivating resources are available from museums, art galleries, and historical sites.Students analyze the impact of technological innovations on American life.Students use critical-thinking skills and a variety of primary and secondary source material to explain and apply different methods that historians use to understand and interpret the past, including multiple points of view and historical context.

(7) State and federal laws mandate a variety of celebrations and observances, including Celebrate Freedom Week. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the causes and effects of changing demographic patterns resulting from migration within the United States, including western expansion, rural to urban, the Great Migration, and the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt; and (B) analyze the causes and effects of changing demographic patterns resulting from legal and illegal immigration to the United States. The student understands the relationship between population growth and modernization on the physical environment. The student is expected to: (A) describe how the economic impact of the Transcontinental Railroad and the Homestead Act contributed to the close of the frontier in the late 19th century; (B) describe the changing relationship between the federal government and private business, including the costs and benefits of laissez-faire, anti-trust acts, the Interstate Commerce Act, and the Pure Food and Drug Act; (C) explain how foreign policies affected economic issues such as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the Open Door Policy, Dollar Diplomacy, and immigration quotas; (D) describe the economic effects of international military conflicts, including the Spanish-American War and World War I, on the United States; and (E) describe the emergence of monetary policy in the United States, including the Federal Reserve Act of 1913 and the shifting trend from a gold standard to fiat money. The student understands significant economic developments between World War I and World War II. The student is expected to: (A) describe the economic effects of World War II on the home front such as the end of the Great Depression, rationing, and increased opportunity for women and minority employment; (B) identify the causes of prosperity in the 1950s, including the Baby Boom and the impact of the GI Bill (Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944), and the effects of prosperity in the 1950s such as increased consumption and the growth of agriculture and business; (C) describe the economic impact of defense spending on the business cycle and education priorities from 1945 to the 1990s; (D) identify actions of government and the private sector such as the Great Society, affirmative action, and Title IX to create economic opportunities for citizens and analyze the unintended consequences of each; and (E) describe the dynamic relationship between U. The student is expected to: (A) evaluate the impact of New Deal legislation on the historical roles of state and federal government; (B) explain constitutional issues raised by federal government policy changes during times of significant events, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the 1960s, and 9/11; (C) describe the effects of political scandals, including Teapot Dome, Watergate, and Bill Clinton's impeachment, on the views of U. citizens concerning trust in the federal government and its leaders; (D) discuss the role of contemporary government legislation in the private and public sectors such as the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977, USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009; and (E) evaluate the pros and cons of U. participation in international organizations and treaties. The student is expected to: (A) describe the impact of events such as the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and the War Powers Act on the relationship between the legislative and executive branches of government; and (B) evaluate the impact of relationships among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government, including Franklin D. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the effects of landmark U. The student is expected to: (A) use a variety of both primary and secondary valid sources to acquire information and to analyze and answer historical questions; (B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing and contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations, making predictions, drawing inferences, and drawing conclusions; (C) understand how historians interpret the past (historiography) and how their interpretations of history may change over time; (D) use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple types of sources of evidence; (E) evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author, including points of view, frames of reference, and historical context; (F) identify bias in written, oral, and visual material; (G) identify and support with historical evidence a point of view on a social studies issue or event; and (H) use appropriate skills to analyze and interpret social studies information such as maps, graphs, presentations, speeches, lectures, and political cartoons. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms.

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